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In needlepoint, the term “basketweave stitch” is used because , when viewed from the back, a canvas stitched in this manner will display the interlocking  pattern of, say, an old-fashioned  basket made of wicker reeds.

It is somewhat trickier to explain than the Continental. But the basic process of stitching each individual stitch remains the same.  You still bring the needle up through a bottom left quadrant hole, cross the center of the + sign, and bring it down the top right quadrant.  The next two stitches will start to form a diagonal row, thus commencing the process of “climbing up the stairs, and sliding down the pole.”

Using the numbering scheme of the diagram on this page, you go up (1) and bring the needle down through the hole at the end of the arrow.  Next, you shift down one row, and repeat the process, going up (2) and down through the hole at the end of the arrow.

Here comes the diagonal part.

Next, you bring the needle up from the lower left box marked (3), and bring it down again, through the hole end of the arrow.  You have just gone up a stair.  Next, you bring the needle up from the lower left box marked (4), and bring it down again through hole the end of the arrow.  This would be as if you are doing a Continental Stitch, going down the row one step only.

But then, instead of proceeding to (10) — as you would if doing the Continental — you bring the needle up from the lower left box marked (5), and bring it down again through hole the end of the arrow.  You have now started, as they say, sliding down the pole.  Repeat till the end of the diagonal row.

Voilà!

Congratulations.  You have just learned how to do the Basketweave Stitch.

© Erin McGrath and Needlepointland.com, 2012 – 2016.

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